Monday, 4 October 2010

heroes of might and magic 3

Spending even a short time with the game quells any doubt that it's anything but an excellent sequel and a first-rate strategy game in its own right.
The first two games were especially notable for their colorful storybook-style graphics, which lent either one a quirky sense of humor in spite of the epic subject. You'd witness hundreds of peasants being slaughtered by, for instance, a pack of minotaurs. But because both the peasants and the minotaurs looked silly, and because their numbers were graphically abstracted onscreen with just a single unit representing the army, it was difficult to take the combat too seriously.

ven though it plays about the same, a veteran of the first two Heroes games will initially suspect that Heroes of Might and Magic III is a departure from the series because of its face-lift. Specifically, it tries to look a little more serious. Many of the units seem more dangerous than before, and at first, the look can put you off. The 3D-rendered units seem to lack some of the charm and character of the previous games, in part because the higher resolution graphics mean all the creatures appear smaller onscreen than before. Still, further inspection reveals that the old flame still burns - just take a look at the new units like the devils (complete with scythes, ram horns, and sideburns) or the behemoths (lots of hair, teeth, and claws) and you'll see that the series still retains its trademark sense of humor.
While not all of the monsters in Heroes III look interesting, most of its graphics are beautiful, especially for a genre that typically neglects its appearance for the sake of gameplay. Heroes of Might and Magic III sounds even more impressive, with incredible and well-suited orchestral themes for each castle, although the operatic vocals from Heroes II are conspicuously absent.
The turn-based gameplay has you recruiting mercenary heroes, whom you then guide about an overhead map jam-packed with resources, treasure, magical artifacts, mysterious landmarks, monsters, and more. Using the resources your heroes acquire, you augment your towns so that they can produce more powerful units, or still more resources. Meanwhile your heroes gain experience, skills, and spells, and you put them in command of the largest armies that you can afford in an ultimate effort to defeat the enemy mercenaries looking to conquer you first. As your heroes earn experience through combat and exploration, you'll want to utilize some for castle sieges, while others will make far better scouts or magic users. All the while, you need to balance resources between recruiting new troops and heroes, and building new facilities in your castles.

18 comments:

  1. Great post!

    looking forward to reading the next one

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  2. Ah man, this game was awesome.
    I played this game to death when it first came out.
    Might have to dig it out again

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  3. Never had a chance to get into this series, but it looks like I might pick this one up!

    btw, you might want to change that initial font, black on black is a bit tough to read. Had to highlight it to see it.

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  4. Looks like fun kind of reminds me of Age of Mythology!

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  5. Epically old school game <3

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  6. I used to love playing this so much, perhaps it's time to play again :D

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  7. It's good to see that you're beating inertia today :)

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  8. Yeah I also played it, pretty good, but I have better ones!

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  9. I just nostalgia-ed hardcore when I saw that image.

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  10. ive never played the first one but maybe ill check it out.

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  11. wow, can't believe this game came out ten years ago. i watsted so much of time on this game.

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  12. Turnbased game-play is a bit... played out now. Feels ancient!

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